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How to Help as a Grandparent

Archive for the ‘Personal perspectives’ Category

How to Help as a Grandparent

This article was contributed by Terry Fetzer, who is an Autism Resource Specialist in the Eastern region and has a son and a grandson with autism. Most of us remember what a miracle it was when we became a parent of a child. The years pass, and now your child is an adult having a…

Supported Employment Brings Fulfillment

Editor’s note: This article previously appeared in ASNC’s Spectrum magazine. David Roth’s parents never have to wake him up in the morning or push him to get out the door on time for his job. The 27-year-old with autism works at the Courtyard in Chapel Hill, mostly in the fast-paced, physically demanding laundry, but he…

’Tis the Season … for Opportunities!

  Vickie Dieter is an Autism Resource Specialist in the Catawba Valley region and mom to a son with autism. Many families who have children and other family members with an Autism Spectrum Disorder have a collection of war stories and battle scars (emotional and physical) associated with the holiday season. Children, youth, and adults…

Surviving the Season: Tips to Help You Enjoy the Holidays

This article was contributed by Wanda Curley, an Autism Resource Specialist in the Triad and mom to a son with autism. The holidays are anticipated by many, yet when the temperatures cool and bells start jingling, we will all be likely to hear people around us talking about the added stress and strain they can…

Camp Royall: Better than the Beach

This article was written for the 2016 Camp Chronicle, which will be posted online later this month and mailed to campers and their families. To learn more about ASNC’s Camp Royall, go to www.camproyall.org. For Scott Lambeth, a day at Camp Royall is better than a day at the beach. Scott, who is 40 years…

Run/Walk for Autism: A Day “I Can Just Be Me!”

Two years ago at the 2014 Triangle Run/Walk for Autism, 7-year-old Abigail was in tears after crossing the finish line. She told her worried mother that she was sad because she didn’t win the race. Abigail’s parents explained to her that finishing first was not their goal. The little girl with autism took the lesson…

Big Sister Takes Lessons to Heart

  Sydney Ramey has learned many things from her younger brother, Charlie, like how to be patient and responsible. Sydney is 17 and Charlie, who has autism, is 14. Sydney says she also has learned from Charlie that “sometimes it’s best just to throw away your cares and laugh till it hurts.” That’s not all…