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How to Advocate for Yourself

Archive for the ‘Adults with Autism’ Category

How to Advocate for Yourself

The feeling of being in control of one’s own life is one of the most basic yet most important forms of self-worth we have as people and an essential part of happiness. However, it is one of the most difficult aspects of being on the spectrum. The transition to adulthood is a fraught time for…

Developing Independence with a ‘Who Supports Me’ List

Often, autism self-advocates are connected to multiple systems and have many names, numbers, addresses, and details to keep up with to navigate supports, including services and benefits. The contacts they maintain are often over and above the number of contacts for their same-age peers maintaining independent lifestyles. When my daughter went to college, one of…

Q&A with Mindy Govan, new Transition and Employment Services Director

The Autism Society of North Carolina has long recognized the growing need for more supports for young adults with autism. Our current strategic plan calls for a focus on transition services, employment supports, and the social needs of young adults and adults with autism. This spring, we created statewide positions to lead our Transition and…

Visual Schedules Important Even as Children Grow Up

My son Logan is 18 years old, soon to turn 19. I have learned over the years how important it is to Logan to have a visual schedule. The schedule must be specific as well as complete. The details of his day must be spelled out and available for him to see. Not having something…

Preparing Your Loved One for Adult Success

I have been employed by the Autism Society of NC for more than 20 years, and I can honestly say that we have definitely hit a surge in calls regarding adults looking for meaningful employment as well as parents looking to get their adult children out in the community. Parents of adults typically call for…

Planning for Their Future, Not Just Hoping

Almost daily I speak to a parent about their child’s future. Like any parent, they want to know that their child will be taken care of and happy. Every child with autism is unique and so are their needs now and in the future. I wish I had the answers, but I have to ask…

Employing Adults with Autism: You Can Help

The need for employment opportunities for adults with autism is significant; studies have shown that a majority of them are unemployed or underemployed. For individuals on the spectrum, employment not only fosters financial stability and promotes greater independence but also increases self-esteem and provides opportunities to improve social skills, grow a network of friends and…