I Really Am Listening to You!

Posts Tagged ‘autism communication’

I Really Am Listening to You!

I really am listening to you! My eyes are looking elsewhere. I’m playing with something. I’m rocking. Humming. Giving an unpleasant facial expression. Fill in the blank! “Normal” people look right at you and respond. Sorry! I can’t! But I can listen! I AM listening! You are very important to me. Your thoughts are interesting….

Teaching Skills to Prepare for Back to School

Going back to school after time off for the summer is an exciting, but often overwhelming time. You may begin to feel some nervousness about how your loved one will transition to a new schedule or even navigate a new environment. To help prepare them for the new school year, it is important to think…

Shutting Down Like an Overloaded Computer

Why does your computer suddenly choke on you? Are 1,000 windows open? Is YouTube playing while Facebook is showing cat videos? Is a browser doing some sneaky scans on the hard drive? It’s all eating the data and memory. Too many tasks at once! Computer crash! Well, imagine an autistic brain working like that. Give…

New Cat Coming Soon

After a day of rushing around from therapy to therapy, I pulled into the driveway to see something written in a primitive-looking chalk square on the concrete pad in front of our garage. I parked the van in the garage and went back out to read the important message I had just driven over. The…

Focus on Anxiety at the Annual Conference

Dr. Patrick Friman, who has more than 30 years of experience as a licensed psychologist, opened the Autism Society of North Carolina’s annual conference with “Anxiety and Sleep: Addressing Life’s Challenges.” For those who were not able to attend his presentation in Charlotte, we are sharing highlights of the anxiety portion here. Dr. Friman began…

Visual Schedules Important Even as Children Grow Up

My son Logan is 18 years old, soon to turn 19. I have learned over the years how important it is to Logan to have a visual schedule. The schedule must be specific as well as complete. The details of his day must be spelled out and available for him to see. Not having something…

Time to get ready for the time change

Many individuals with autism value routine. It makes them feel secure to know when and why something is happening. So when the time changes each spring and fall, some individuals may feel a loss of control and have a more difficult time adjusting than some people do. They may feel disoriented when it stays light…